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"Multimodal Literacies- Teaching and Learning English in the Digital Age", 3-8-07


76:49 minutes (17.61 MB)
By Dr. Suzanne Miller, 2007

Emerging Literacies: The 2nd Annual Mary Louise White Symposium, March 8, 2007 at SUNY Fredonia. Dr. Suzanne Miller, Associate Professor of English Education, Graduate School of Education at the University at Buffalo. This podcast includes the audio portion of several student-created videos from City Voices, City Visions; visit their website at www.gse.buffalo.edu/org/cityvoices to view the videos online and learn more about this project.

"The Information Literacy Equation- Millennials, Research, and Critical Thinking", 3-9-07


74:37 minutes (17.11 MB)
By Stewart Brower, 2007

Emerging Literacies: The 2nd Annual Mary Louise White Symposium March 9, 2007 at SUNY Fredonia. Stewart Brower, Coordinator of Information Management Education, University at Buffalo Health Sciences Library; library liaison, UB School of Pharmacy. Stewart Browser's presentation is available on his blog at http://notes.smbrower.com. The student-created pharmaceutical wiki, PubDrug, cited in this presentation can found at http://www.pubdrug.org/

"The Role of Multiple Literacies in Learning and Writing", 3-9-07


79:49 minutes (18.3 MB)
By Dr. Patricia Dunn, 2007

Emerging Literacies: The 2nd Annual Mary Louise White Symposium, March 9, 2007 at SUNY Fredonia. Dr. Patricia Dunn, Associate Professor of English and English Education, SUNY Stony Brook. Learn more about Dr. Dunn's work at http://ws.cc.stonybrook.edu/english/faculty/dunn.html

"Earth Democracy: Living with Justice on a Small Planet", 4-10-07


67:28 minutes (11.61 MB)
By Dr. Vandana Shiva, 2007

"Earth Democracy: Living with Justice on a Small Planet", by Dr. Vandana Shiva, a lecture on biodiversity, the Law of Gaia and the Law of the Market. Recorded in Thompson Hall, on April 10, 2007, at SUNY Fredonia.

"Coolness Factor: Taking the Temperature of Leni Riefenstahl's Aesthetics of Cool"


75:00 minutes (17.22 MB)
By Dr. Ingeborg Majer O'Sickey, 2008

Recorded Tuesday, Feb. 19, at 7 p.m. in Room W101 Thompson Hall on SUNY Fredonia campus, the keynote lecture, Coolness Factor: Taking the Temperature of Leni Riefenstahl's Aesthetics of Cool focused on the ways in which debates over Riefenstahl’s work enter into current cinematic practice as well as film history, ethics and censorship. The keynote speaker is Dr. Ingeborg Majer O’Sickey, professor of German and director of Women’s Studies at SUNY Binghamton.  An internationally recognized scholar of German film and film theory, she is the author of the 1998 book Triangulated Visions: Women in Recent German Cinema, and of a forthcoming monograph analyzing the representation of gender and nation in films of the Nazi era. She is co-editor of Riefenstahl Screened: An Anthology of New Criticism slated for release in December 2008.  Dr. O’Sickey’s lecture has been made possible by a grant from the Carnahan-Jackson Fund for the Humanities of the Fredonia College Foundation.

"A Priori Skepticism" (Research Talk)


29:24 minutes (6.74 MB)
By Dr. James Beebe - University at Buffalo, State University of New York, 2008

Lecture by Dr. James Beebe, Ph.D., Philosophy department, University at Buffalo, given March 13, 2008 at 5PM in Fenton Hall 105, at SUNY Fredonia.

Sponsored by the Carnahan-Jackson Fund for the Humanities.

More information and video from the Young Philosophers lecture series at SUNY Fredonia is available at http://www.youngphilosophers.org

"Design or Chance? The Fine-Tuning Argument for the Existence of God" (Introductory Level Talk)


41:50 minutes (9.57 MB)
By Dr. James Beebe - University at Buffalo, State University of New York, 2008

"Design or Chance? The Fine-Tuning Argument for the Existence of God" by James Beebe, Ph.D. from Department of Philosophy, University at Buffalo. Lecture given in Fenton Hall, room 105 at SUNY Fredonia, March 14 at 2:30PM.

Sponsored by the Carnahan-Jackson Fund for the Humanities.

More information and video from the Young Philosophers lecture series at SUNY Fredonia is available at http://www.youngphilosophers.org

"The A Priori Defended: A Defense of the Generality Argument" (Research Talk)


27:35 minutes (6.31 MB)
By Dr. Joshua Thurow - Augustana College, 2008

"The A Priori Defended: A Defense of the Generality Argument", a lecture by Dr. Joshua Thurow of Augustana College, given April 24 at 5pm in Fenton Hall 105, SUNY Fredonia.

More information and video from the Young Philosophers lecture series at SUNY Fredonia is available at http://www.youngphilosophers.org

"Is Morality Real, or Do We Make It Up?" (Introductory Level Talk)


20:34 minutes (4.72 MB)
By Dr. Joshua Thurow - Augustana College, 2008

"Is Morality Real, or Do We Make It Up?", a lecture by Dr. Joshua Thurow of Augustana College, given April 25 at 2:30 PM in Fenton Hall 105, SUNY Fredonia.

More information and video from the Young Philosophers lecture series at SUNY Fredonia is available at http://www.youngphilosophers.org

Marcellus Shale - Are we full of gas?


31:56 minutes (7.29 MB)
By Dr. Gary Lash, 2008

Dr. Gary Lash, a professor in the Geosciences Dept. at SUNY Fredonia, gave a community lecture at Fredonia Place on the subject of the Marcellus shale formation. The Marcellus black shale is a geological unit that extends throughout the Appalachian Basin, from southwestern New York through much of Pennsylvania and parts of West Virginia, Maryland and Ohio. It is one of the hottest natural gas plays in North America, significant in the amount of the untapped natural gas, as well as its proximity towards the high demand market and pipeline infrastructure of the northeastern United States.

Dr. Lash was recently interviewed for CNN money and was a keynote scientist on the History Channel’s “Crude” documentary. He determined that more than 50 trillion cubic feet of natural gas may be contained in the Marcellus black shale, enough, according to Dr. Lash, “to give us two more years of cleaner burning hydro carbon and to enable us to explore energy alternatives.“ Dr. Lash discusses how the drilling for natural gas in the US first began in Fredonia, and the significance of Chautauqua County being the county with the most drilled wells in New York State and how this formation has made millionaires out of ordinary citizens overnight in other counties in the mid-state.

This public talk was given by Dr. Lash on Sept 30, 2008, at 6:30pm at Fredonia Place, 50 Howard St, Fredonia, NY.

A PDF of the slides for this presentation is available for download.

Truth and Consequences: Adventures in Language, Literature and Culture


25:45 minutes (5.91 MB)
By Dr. Jeanette McVicker, 2008

"Truth and Consequences: Adventures in Language, Literature and Culture " - a lecture by Dr. Jeanette McVicker, 2008 faculty recipient of the SUNY Fredonia President's Award for Excellence. Recorded in Rosch Recital Hall, SUNY Fredonia, Sept. 30, 2008.

Established in 1986, the President’s Award for Excellence is presented each year to a teacher-scholar to recognize innovative and highly effective teaching, and each year that individual presents a lecture to the campus community. SUNY Fredonia President Dennis Hefner introduced Dr. McVicker.

Multimedia slides with audio may be downloaded from:
http://tinyurl.com/52fnxc
(Requires iTunes/QuickTime to view slides).

Print-ready PDF slides may be downloaded from:
http://tinyurl.com/4z4qx5
(Requires Adobe Acrobat Reader to view slides)

Homeless Children, Youth and Families


37:51 minutes (9 MB)
By Diane Nilan, 2008

Diane Nilan is an advocate, working to raise awareness of homelessness for children and teens.

In July 2005 Nilan created HEAR US, a nonprofit organization to give voice and visibility to homeless children, youth and families. In November 2005, having sold her house, car and most of her possessions, Nilan purchased an RV to set out on an extraordinary venture: to create a documentary featuring kids talking about their homelessness.

Diane Nilan’s unconventional approach takes her to places not typically thought of as experiencing homelessness: rural areas, resort communities, affluent cities and towns. She’s invited homeless children, teens, and parents to share their thoughts on video, highlighting the plight and dreams of the most invisible homeless population: young people and families.

Learn about HEAR US at:
http://www.hearus.us/

Read Diane's blog at:
http://beta.razoo.com/member/dianen/blog

This lecture was organized and recorded by the SUNY Fredonia Teacher Education Club on Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2008 at 7pm in the Williams Center, SUNY Fredonia.

Public presentation by Dave Smith, President and CEO of National Fuel


32:18 minutes (7.41 MB)
By Dave Smith, 2009

Dave Smith, '74, President and CEO of the $4.3 billion National Fuel Gas Co., returned home to share his story and advice to SUNY Fredonia students on Friday at 11 a.m. in Rosch Recital Hall.

"'…to compare a rather uncertain impression of the new continent with reality' – Stefan Zweig and New York"


32:17 minutes (11.24 MB)
By Nikolaus Unger, University of Warwick, 2009

A presentation given at the 2009 Zweig Symposium, held October 1-3, 2009 at the State University of New York at Fredonia. Full program details: http://www.fredonia.edu/library/special_collections/zweigsymposium.asp

"Approaching the Far Away: Magellan and Amerigo"


27:44 minutes (9.68 MB)
By Christine Berthold, University of Macerata, 2009

A presentation given at the 2009 Zweig Symposium, held October 1-3, 2009 at the State University of New York at Fredonia. Full program details: http://www.fredonia.edu/library/special_collections/zweigsymposium.asp

"The Generational Biography: Zweig vs. Flaubert"


31:48 minutes (11.07 MB)
By Birger Vanwesenbeeck, State University of New York at Fredonia, 2009

A presentation given at the 2009 Zweig Symposium, held October 1-3, 2009 at the State University of New York at Fredonia. Full program details: http://www.fredonia.edu/library/special_collections/zweigsymposium.asp

"The Netherworld of Yesterday: An Imaginary Conversation between Stefan Zweig and Hannah Arendt"


40:35 minutes (14.15 MB)
By George Prochnik, independent scholar, 2009

A presentation given at the 2009 Zweig Symposium, held October 1-3, 2009 at the State University of New York at Fredonia. Full program details: http://www.fredonia.edu/library/special_collections/zweigsymposium.asp

"The Unfantomable Gesture"


19:41 minutes (6.89 MB)
By Sylvio Back, filmmaker, director of "Lost Zweig", 2009

A presentation given at the 2009 Zweig Symposium, held October 1-3, 2009 at the State University of New York at Fredonia. Full program details: http://www.fredonia.edu/library/special_collections/zweigsymposium.asp

"'Das Paradies ist überall verloren': Stefan Zweig’s Concept of Brazil..."


31:08 minutes (10.87 MB)
By Marlen Eckl, independent scholar, 2009

A presentation given at the 2009 Zweig Symposium, held October 1-3, 2009 at the State University of New York at Fredonia. Full program details: http://www.fredonia.edu/library/special_collections/zweigsymposium.asp

"Stefan Zweig and Brazil: 'The Land of the Future'"


11:31 minutes (4.02 MB)
By Brenda Keiser, Bloomsburg University, 2009

A presentation given at the 2009 Zweig Symposium, held October 1-3, 2009 at the State University of New York at Fredonia. Full program details: http://www.fredonia.edu/library/special_collections/zweigsymposium.asp

The Casa Stefan Zweig Project in Petropolis


17:49 minutes (6.21 MB)
By Marlen Eckl, representative of the Casa Stefan Zweig, Petropolis, Brazil, 2009

A presentation given at the 2009 Zweig Symposium, held October 1-3, 2009 at the State University of New York at Fredonia. Full program details: http://www.fredonia.edu/library/special_collections/zweigsymposium.asp

"Stefan Zweig's Non-fictional Prose in Exile - Mastery of the European Genre of 'Kunstprosa'"


66:48 minutes (23.24 MB)
By Klaus Weissenberger, Rice University, 2009

A presentation given at the 2009 Zweig Symposium, held October 1-3, 2009 at the State University of New York at Fredonia. Full program details: http://www.fredonia.edu/library/special_collections/zweigsymposium.asp

"Stefan Zweig: Life in Cities of Exile / New York, Sao Paolo, Rio de Janeiro"


38:31 minutes (13.56 MB)
By Klemens Renoldner, Director of Stefan Zweig Center, Salzburg, Austria, 2009

A presentation given at the 2009 Zweig Symposium, held October 1-3, 2009 at the State University of New York at Fredonia. Full program details: http://www.fredonia.edu/library/special_collections/zweigsymposium.asp

"Stefan Zweig's Transnationalism in the Making"


43:31 minutes (15.14 MB)
By Eva Kuttenberg, Pennsylvania State University, Erie, 2009

A presentation given at the 2009 Zweig Symposium, held October 1-3, 2009 at the State University of New York at Fredonia. Full program details: http://www.fredonia.edu/library/special_collections/zweigsymposium.asp

"Structuring Alterity: Stefan Zweig, Emmanuel Levinas, and the Trauma of the Other"


21:35 minutes (7.52 MB)
By Robert Whalen, Queens University of Charlotte, 2009

A presentation given at the 2009 Zweig Symposium, held October 1-3, 2009 at the State University of New York at Fredonia. Full program details: http://www.fredonia.edu/library/special_collections/zweigsymposium.asp

"Introduction: Zweig Bibliography in Wiki Format"


37:46 minutes (13.23 MB)
By Randolph Klawiter, University of Notre Dame, 2009

A presentation given at the 2009 Zweig Symposium, held October 1-3, 2009 at the State University of New York at Fredonia. Full program details: http://www.fredonia.edu/library/special_collections/zweigsymposium.asp

Mary Louise White Symposium 2010 keynote on Sophocles' "Electra"


82:02 minutes (18.79 MB)
By Dr. Carolyn Higbie, 2010

Dr. Carolyn Higbie, professor in the Classics department at the University at Buffalo, delivered the 2010 Mary Louise White symposium keynote address on Wednesday, Feb 17, 2010 at 4:30 pm, in the Horizon Room of the Williams Campus Center, SUNY Fredonia.

Professor Higbie's talk addressed the relevance of Electra, and considered how we might bring classical drama into the present, keeping a millennia-old tradition alive through the beginning of our own millennium.